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KPTZ Compass: Discussing State v. Blake with public defender Richard Davies and prosecutor James Kennedy

In a narrow 5-4 ruling, the Washington State Supreme Court recently declared the state’s felony drug possession law unconstitutional because it did not require proof that the accused knowingly or intentionally possessed the drugs. This week on the Compass, we talk with Jefferson County Prosecutor James Kennedy and then with Public Defender Richard Davies aboutContinue reading “KPTZ Compass: Discussing State v. Blake with public defender Richard Davies and prosecutor James Kennedy”

Oppose SB 5468, the uninspired “quick fix” to State v. Blake ruling

Just one day after the Washington State Supreme Court ruled that the state’s drug possession statute was unconstitutional, two State senators introduced Senate Bill 5468 , which would reinstate the law by adding the word “knowingly” to the statute. The ruling in the case, State v. Blake, decriminalizes the possession of controlled substances, after justices found the statute was unconstitutionalContinue reading “Oppose SB 5468, the uninspired “quick fix” to State v. Blake ruling”

Washington state has never pulled an officer’s badge for excessive force. That may be changing.

From Seattle Times reporter Mike Reicher. A contentious bill that passed the state Senate could transform Washington’s police oversight agency from an anemic watchdog into a formidable instrument for police accountability. While other reform efforts in Olympia focus on high-profile police tactics, such as prohibiting chokeholds and neck restraints, this bill takes aim at aContinue reading “Washington state has never pulled an officer’s badge for excessive force. That may be changing.”

‘These aren’t my pants’: WA Supreme Court rules charging drug possession unconstitutional

Possession of drugs is no longer a felony in Washington State, after the state Supreme Court found the VUCSA statute unconstitutional on Feb. 25. The ruling in the case, State v. Blake, decriminalizes the possession of controlled substances. Five justices said in the ruling the statute was unconstitutional because it doesn’t require prosecutors to prove that someone knowinglyContinue reading “‘These aren’t my pants’: WA Supreme Court rules charging drug possession unconstitutional”

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